Orillia- Scottish fest, Complete the Trent Severn

We did locks 38 to 40; then crossed Lake Simcoe on July

Luck is with us as we arrive in  Orillia in time for Scottish festival!  Now if the rain holds off , it will be a fun weekend!
LAKE SIMCOE TO ORILLIA
Weekend boaters- funneling into the inlet leading to Orillia is wild. There are fast boats , sailboats, jet skis , fishing boats and canoes !

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PORT OF ORILLIA
Had reservations for a slip in a new marina called Port of Orillia. It is a popular spot this weekend for Looper boats. We were invited to a looper docktail party- attended by 30 or so boaters.

Art in the Streets featured maple leafs painted by local artists. There are 150 displays in honor of the 150 year celebration.

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Dave’s niece Lindsay lives on Lake Simcoe . We arranged to meet her for dinner in Barrie -about 30 minutes away, We had dinner at “the Farmhouse”. Excellent meal. Especially enjoyed the oreo cheesecake dessert!

So far we have logged 6002.9 miles!!

After Orillia, head for the BIG CHUTE Railway lock.

First we had to wait over an hour for a swing bridge to open. The train was coming, but it had air brake problems, and had been delayed.

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The Big Chute lock # 44 is another unique lift. It is a Marine Railway added in 1960.

The boat is placed on a cradle with straps and it is carried over a portage on a railway; then gently floated into the other side. We went first then took photos of Southern Cross coming through.
The Big Chute works on an inclined plane to carry boats in individual cradles over a change in height that reaches about 60 feet. This is the only marine railway of its kind in North America still in use. This is a one of a kind piece of engineering.
the big chute the big chute

the big chute

Boats are floated onto the partially submerged Big Chute railway carriage on either the upstream or downstream side, and are cradled by slings. Your boat is moved along a railway track, lifted out of the water and carried over the waterfall and then, gently floated into the water on the other side. Boaters remain on their vessel, and the workers ride the lift up and over as well.
This lock was built after the First World War and was intended to be temporary until a regular lock was built. The original marine rail lock was replaced/ upgraded in 1976. The current carriage was opened in 1976 and can carry boats up to 100 feet long.

We have completed the Trent Severn as we pass through the final lock leading out to Georgian Bay.

Here is a recap of the 44 locks of the  Trent Severn

The first 6 locks are with in12 miles.

day 1:

1 Trenton

2 Sydney

3 glen Miller

4 Batawa

5 Trent

6 Frankford  wall with electric

Day 2 :

7 Glen Ross

8 Percy Reach

9 Meyers

10 Hauges Reach

11/12 Ranney Falls

13 Campbelford  (  stayed on the city wall $1.40 ft)

Day 3 :

14 Crowe Bay

15 Healy Falls

18 Hastings

19 Scott Mill

20 Ashburnham

21 Peterborough Lift Lock   ** just after our stay in Peterborough

22 Nassau Mills

23 Otonabee

24 Douro

25 Sayer Creek

26 Lakefield

27 Young’s Point

28 Burleigh Falls

30 Lovesick   ( stayed Lock Wall)

31 Buckhorn  (Lock Wall)

32 Bobcageon

33 Lindsay

34 Fenelon Falls   (Lock Wall)

35 Rosedale

36 Kirkfield  (Highest point-start locking down)

37 Bolsover (stayed at marina)

38 Talbot

39 Portage

40 Thorax

41 Game bridge

42 Koochiching

43 Swift Rapids

44 Big Chute (Marine Railway lifts over a road)

45 Port Severn (leads into Georgian Bay)

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About mnsailors

Our blog will highlight our travels along America's Great Loop. We sold our sailboat on Lake Superior for a Trawler to do America's Great Loop in 2016.
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